How to live stream a Microsoft Teams meeting to YouTube without installing additional software

Live streaming Teams meetings and webinars to YouTube may expand your audience and allow for more viewers to engage with your event than otherwise might. It’s great for running a virtual conference or event where you need to embed YouTube videos in the platform for a streamlined approach. YouTube also saves your live streams as videos in your channel without the need to do a separate upload after an event. This concept gives users/presenters the ease of just having a normal Teams meeting, but the power of enhanced broadcasting and distribution.

Though I’m focused on YouTube in this blog post, the same setup on the Teams side is required to live stream to social media platforms or otherwise.

Thanks to recent updates to Microsoft Teams, you no longer need OBS Studio or other third-party software installations to live stream your Microsoft Teams events to YouTube. However, this ability launched in disabled state by default, so a Teams Administrator will need to complete the prerequisites prior to someone being able to live stream.

Note

At this time, live streaming only works for meetings and webinars in Microsoft Teams – not live events.

Admin prerequisites to live streaming with Microsoft Teams

Before users can broadcast their live stream from Microsoft Teams, a Teams administrator needs to create or modify a Meeting policy and:

  • Enable Live Streaming Mode (General section)
  • Turn on Local Broadcasting (Audio & video section)

You can modify the Global (Org-wide) default Meeting policy which would allow everyone to broadcast and live stream, or you can create/modify a separate Meeting policy and apply it only to specific users who should be allowed to live stream.

Here’s how to modify the Global (Org-wide) default meeting policy to allow everyone in your org to live stream:

  1. Go to the Teams admin center (https://admin.teams.microsoft.com/)
  2. Select Meetings | Meeting policies
  3. Select the name of the policy you wish to modify. In this example, Global (Org-wide) default).
Location of the global/default meeting policy in the Microsoft Teams Admin Center | Click to enlarge
  1. Enable Live streaming mode, and turn on Local broadcasting as seen in the following screenshot.
Live streaming settings in a Meeting policy | Click to enlarge

Technically, you could just enable Live streaming mode for this post. But by also turning on Local broadcasting (NDI), your users will have greater flexibility to produce their Microsoft Teams events with broadcasting software like OBS Studio, XSplit, etc. which gives additional capabilities like setting up scenes and such.

  1. Click Save

Note

The changes may take an hour or so to take effect after saving your policy changes.

Your users will now be able to live stream their Teams events. Now let’s go through those steps.

Producer prerequisites to live streaming with Microsoft Teams

If you are going to be the producer of an upcoming event, you’ll need to make a change to your individual Teams client settings before you’re able to proceed.

Simply open your settings in Teams (ellipsis/three dots by your profile picture | Settings) and then select App permissions. Here you can enable NDI capabilities.

NDI capabilities enabled in the Teams client settings | Click to enlarge

How to live stream a Microsoft Teams meeting or webinar to YouTube

Users assigned the policy created or modified in the admin prerequisite section can follow these steps to live stream directly to YouTube from Microsoft Teams.

  1. First we need to set up the live event on the YouTube side. Go to YouTube Studio (https://studio.youtube.com) and sign in with the account you wish to broadcast to.
  2. Click Create | Go live in the upper right
YouTube steps to Go live | Click to enlarge
  1. Choose whether you’re going live Right now, or whether you’re just setting up for a Later date. Either way, you’ll have additional steps that may vary from this post – follow the prompts to complete setup.
Go live options in YouTube | Click to enlarge
  1. Continue through your YouTube prompts but do not go live yet. When you get out of the wizard, be sure you’re on the Stream tab on the left-hand navigation and locate the Stream key and Stream URL. You’ll need to copy both of these and use them later in step 9.
YouTube stream key and stream URL locations | Click to enlarge
  1. Now we need to switch to Microsoft Teams. Join the meeting or webinar you wish to live stream.
  2. Add the Custom Streaming app to the meeting
Steps to add the Custom Streaming app to a Teams meeting | Click to enlarge
  1. Click Add
Custom Streaming app info and confirmation screen | Click to enlarge
  1. Click Save
Custom Streaming app welcome screen | Click to enlarge
  1. In the right-hand panel that opens, paste the Stream key and Stream URL you copied in step 4.
Copy/paste paths for stream key and URL | Click to enlarge
  1. Click Start streaming in the lower right, then select Allow in the dialog box when it appears.
Streaming meeting confirmation dialog | Click to enlarge
  1. You’re now live streaming! Share your screen and/or use your cameras and microphones to run your event as you would any normal Microsoft Teams meeting.
A screenshare from Microsoft Teams being live streamed to YouTube | Click to enlarge
  1. When you’re finished with the event, you can stop streaming via Teams and YouTube.
Stop streaming button in the Custom Streaming app panel | Click to enlarge
End stream button in YouTube | Click to enlarge

Where to find your Microsoft Teams meeting ID and passcode

You may have noticed your Microsoft Teams meeting invites now include meeting IDs and passcodes, and there’s a new Join with an ID button on Calendar. In this blog post I’ll cover several meeting ID-related topics for meeting organizers:

  • Find your Teams meeting ID and passcode
  • Find your Teams meeting ID and passcode during a meeting
  • Add someone to a Teams meeting already in progress
  • Microsoft Teams meeting IDs vs join links

In a rush? Here’s the quick answer:

  • Not in a meeting yet? Open the event on your calendar and you’ll find the meeting ID and passcode in the event details
  • In a meeting already? Go to More | Meeting info

Find your Teams meeting ID and passcode (when not already in the meeting)

  1. Open Microsoft Teams and select Calendar from the left
  2. Double-click or edit the meeting for which you’d like to retrieve the meeting ID
  3. Copy the Meeting ID and Passcode from the meeting details

Note that you can also get the join link from the same section if you prefer. The contents you see here as the meeting organizer (join link, ID, passcode, and call-in info when relevant) is the same contents any invited participants received. They can find this on their calendar by opening the event and viewing its details.

Location of meeting ID and passcode in meeting details (click to enlarge)

Find your Teams meeting ID and passcode during a meeting

To find your Teams meeting join link, meeting ID, and passcode during a meeting, select More | Meeting info.

More | Meeting info in a Teams meeting (click to enlarge)

From here, you can scroll to the bottom for the join link, meeting ID, and passcode.

The location of your meeting’s link, ID, and passcode during a meeting (click to enlarge)

You can select Copy join info at the top of the same panel which resembles the following and includes both entry options as well as call-in info when you’re licensed appropriately. This might be handy to paste in a quick Teams message or email for last-minute requests:

An example of the contents copied to your clipboard when you click Copy join info (click to enlarge)

Add someone to a Teams meeting already in progress

Now let’s imagine you’re in the middle of a Microsoft Teams meeting, and you’d like someone to join you. If they’re in your organization’s directory, you can simply:

  1. Open the People panel
  2. Type in their name and select Request to join next to it when it appears

However, you can’t invite external participants as easily because no matches show up.

No matches found when searching for an external person during a meeting (click to enlarge)

So for external people, use the method described at the beginning of this post (More | Meeting info) and send the join link, meeting ID, and passcode to the individual you’re asking to join. If the link doesn’t work for them and they want to use the ID to join, they’ll go to Calendar in Microsoft Teams, select Join with an ID and enter the info you provided.

A user’s screen when entering a meeting ID and password (click to enlarge)

If they don’t have a Microsoft Teams account to utilize Calendar, there will also be a public join webpage soon where they can enter the meeting ID and passcode and join.

Microsoft Teams meeting IDs vs join links

When it comes to secure meetings, links and IDs are about the same. If someone forwards the meeting invite to a stranger, they can attempt to join the meeting. If you’re concerned about this, perhaps because you’re sharing NDA content in a meeting or just don’t want strangers hopping in, be sure to utilize the “People I Invite” lobby settings so you can decline any unfamiliar or uninvited persons attempting to enter.

Join links specifically are perfectly fine to continue using and they are very difficult for a bad agent (with the intention of crashing your meeting) to guess. Imagine trying to guess something this long and complex, even with bot assistance:

https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19:meeting_MGZlO23U4YjItOTE2MS00ZTSkLWIyMGUtNGRiMWRiYjc4ZjU2@thread.v2/0?context=%7B%22Tid%22:%225a447937-4988-4622-ab53-g1e384ec3c1a%22,%22Oid%22:%22c3db5526-5334-4d0a-ba50-bece903d370%22%7D

Join links are quick and easy for invitees to use. Click the link and you’re at the pre-join screen making sure your devices are setup properly.

Meeting IDs also take you directly to the pre-join screen, and may be a better option if someone is having difficulty using the link you provided. Perhaps their firewall is preventing the link from working or there are other restrictions on their machine that don’t allow them to utilize links normally. Meeting IDs give them an alternative entry method that isn’t dependent on an https:// url.

Why is there a passcode? Without a passcode, a stranger could simply start guessing meeting IDs (which are much easier to guess than the long, complicated join links) and they could pay you and your colleagues an unwanted visit.

Best practice would be to send people both options so they have a backup method if needed. Your meeting invites automatically include both already, and if you’re in a meeting attempting to add someone who wasn’t originally invited, you can go to More | Meeting info and select Copy join info which will copy both options to your clipboard for those last-minute invites via messages or emails.

MS-700 (Managing Microsoft Teams) exam guide SECOND EDITION (May 2022) now available with 168 practice questions

Last year, fellow MVP and MCT Peter Rising and I collaborated on the first edition of an MS-700 exam guide. I’m pleased to share that our second edition reflecting the most up-to-date exam objectives and content is now available. It has over 400 pages and 168 practice questions, making it easy to find and study what’s most important when you need it.

Book cover for our MS-700 exam guide.

You can order our 2nd ed MS-700 exam guide here.

Successfully passing the MS-700 exam earns you the Microsoft 365 Certified: Teams Administrator Associate certification. This is an excellent way to prove skills and proficiency to employers (current and prospective) and also challenge yourself with keeping up-to-date on administering one of Microsoft 365’s core collaboration and communication apps.

I am super appreciative of my co-author, Peter Rising, as well as our reviewers Dan Rey, Yves Habersaat, and Vivek Vinod Sharma who helped make sure this exam guide is the best available. I also want to thank our reviewers from the first edition, Linus Cansby, Adam Deltinger, Amanda Sterner, and Mike Swantek for their foundational contribution that helped us get this far.

And lastly, thank you to all of the amazingly talented staff at Packt who welcomed us to this opportunity and worked with us to create and refine something we are so proud to share with the community.

MS-700 exam guide (2nd ed) table of contents

  1. Plan and configure network settings for Microsoft Teams
  2. Identify licensing requirements for Microsoft Teams
  3. Plan and configure security and compliance settings for Microsoft Teams
  4. Plan and implement governance and lifecycle management for Microsoft Teams
  5. Configure and manage external and guest users
  6. Configure and manage Microsoft Teams devices
  7. Creating and managing teams
  8. Plan and manage channels
  9. Manage chat and collaboration experiences
  10. Manage apps for Microsoft Teams
  11. Manage meeting experiences
  12. Manage phone numbers
  13. Manage Phone System for Microsoft Teams
  14. Monitor and report on a Microsoft Teams environment
  15. Troubleshoot audio, video, and client issues
  16. Mock exam
  17. Mock exam answers and explanations
  18. Answers (and explanations) to practice questions

Order our MS-700 exam guide here.

How to share your screen during a Microsoft Teams meeting

The process used when sharing your screen in Teams depends on whether you’re using the Teams desktop app or web app. I’ll cover both methods in this post, and provide a video demonstration for each.

Share your screen using the Microsoft Teams desktop app

Using the desktop app (installed on your machine), you can share your screen during a meeting in just a few clicks:

  1. Once inside the meeting, select the Share icon (rectangle with an arrow) in the upper right corner next to the Leave button.
  2. Choose which content you’d like to share with the other participants:
    • Screen (one of your monitors and everything you see on it, even if you change windows/apps)
    • Window (one specific window or app – prevents accidentally sharing things like your email)
  3. If you’ll be sharing video audio or music, toggle the button to include computer sound
  4. When finished sharing, use the same Share button to stop sharing.

If you’ll be sharing a PowerPoint presentation, consider using PowerPoint Live as opposed to just screen sharing the full-screen presentation. This enables your attendees to benefit from individual features that won’t affect others including:

  • Moving forwards and backwards through slides for a refresher or more time to consume the content
  • Changing slides to high contrast for better visibility
  • Translating slides to a language of choice
  • Click on links directly on slides (such as social media, references, survey, or company hyperlinks)

Watch the desktop version video demonstration to see these steps performed, including PowerPoint Live:

Share your screen using the Microsoft Teams web app

The web app is entirely browser-based, meaning you don’t need to have anything installed on your device to use it. You can access it anytime from any device with web access by navigating to https://teams.microsoft.com in your browser of choice.

In the web app, you can share your screen during a meeting by following these steps:

  1. Once inside the meeting, select the Share icon (rectangle with an arrow) from the lower central area menu. If the menu has disappeared, simply move your cursor around the meeting space to make it reappear.
  2. Choose which content you’d like to share with the other participants:
    • Desktop/Window (either a whole monitor or a specific app or tab). After you select this, you can then choose between:
      • Entire screen: A whole monitor/screen and everything that becomes visible on it.
      • Window: A single app or window (prevents accidentally sharing things like your email)
      • Microsoft Edge tab: A single browser tab (similar to the app/window option, this prevents accidentally switching to a sensitive app or tab)
      • If you’ll be sharing video audio or music, check the box to Share system audio
    • PowerPoint (PowerPoint Live): Select a recent presentation, or click Browse to find a presentation and utilize this feature.
  3. When finished sharing, use the same Share button to stop sharing or one of the Stop sharing dialogs you may see.

Watch the web version video demonstration to see these steps performed, including PowerPoint Live:

How to add apps to Microsoft Teams (Video)

In this final lesson for this course, learn how you can extend Microsoft Teams by adding additional apps to it. Whether from Microsoft or a third-party provider, your apps can be used within the context of Microsoft Teams making your day simpler and keeping more of your work within a single context.

This video is part of my FREE 30+ lesson self-paced online training course called Collaboration in Microsoft 365 (OneDrive, SharePoint, and Teams). Enroll today at https://www.NateTheTrainer.com for the full learning experience including lesson discussions, quizzes, exams, and a completion certificate.

You can also watch the entire course as a YouTube playlist as well (just without the course discussions, quizzes, exam, and certificate). Be sure to subscribe to support my channel and for easy access to future content.

Notes

You can add or utilize additional apps in Teams in individual chat messages, channel conversation posts, channel or chat tabs, or your left-hand navigation rail. This makes it easier for you and your colleagues to quickly access important resources and tools all within a single context. Teams becomes a one-stop-shop for your communication and collaboration needs because of the flexibility app integrations provide.

Additional resources

How to search and use commands in Microsoft Teams (Video)

You can use the Microsoft Teams search bar to find content, conversations and chats, people, channels, and more. But you can also use it to execute commands. Learn about both in this lesson.

This video is part of my FREE 30+ lesson self-paced online training course called Collaboration in Microsoft 365 (OneDrive, SharePoint, and Teams). Enroll today at https://www.NateTheTrainer.com for the full learning experience including lesson discussions, quizzes, exams, and a completion certificate.

You can also watch the entire course as a YouTube playlist as well (just without the course discussions, quizzes, exam, and certificate). Be sure to subscribe to support my channel and for easy access to future content.

Notes

Your search bar does more than just search. You can find files, messages, people, teams, channels, and more using the search bar and the filters available in results. You can also execute commands by beginning with a forward slash (/) and typing or selecting an available command such as /pop to pop a chat out into a separate window.

Be sure to check out the shortcut and command PDF handout linked below.

Additional resources

Personal settings, preferences, and status in Microsoft Teams (Video)

Learn how to manage your personal settings, app preferences, and your availability status in Microsoft Teams.

This video is part of my FREE 30+ lesson self-paced online training course called Collaboration in Microsoft 365 (OneDrive, SharePoint, and Teams). Enroll today at https://www.NateTheTrainer.com for the full learning experience including lesson discussions, quizzes, exams, and a completion certificate.

You can also watch the entire course as a YouTube playlist as well (just without the course discussions, quizzes, exam, and certificate). Be sure to subscribe to support my channel and for easy access to future content.

Notes

In addition to managing your chat and channel notification settings, you’re also able to configure your status/availability, out of office settings, display preferences, and much more by taking advantage of all that’s available in your settings dialog (ellipsis next to your profile photo > Settings).

Click to enlarge

Additional resources

How to join and participate in Microsoft Teams meetings (Video)

Learn how to attend a Microsoft Teams meeting and what your options and features are when meeting online.

This video is part of my FREE 30+ lesson self-paced online training course called Collaboration in Microsoft 365 (OneDrive, SharePoint, and Teams). Enroll today at https://www.NateTheTrainer.com for the full learning experience including lesson discussions, quizzes, exams, and a completion certificate.

You can also watch the entire course as a YouTube playlist as well (just without the course discussions, quizzes, exam, and certificate). Be sure to subscribe to support my channel and for easy access to future content.

Notes

Attending a meeting is usually as simple as clicking a join link and turning your devices (camera and microphone) on or off as desired. There are several features available to attendees throughout a meeting including chat and reactions, live captions, device settings, and more. Meeting organizers may also have attendees participate in polls, breakout rooms, and more.

Additional resources

How to schedule meetings in Microsoft Teams (Video)

Learn how to schedule Microsoft Teams online meetings.

This video is part of my FREE 30+ lesson self-paced online training course called Collaboration in Microsoft 365 (OneDrive, SharePoint, and Teams). Enroll today at https://www.NateTheTrainer.com for the full learning experience including lesson discussions, quizzes, exams, and a completion certificate.

You can also watch the entire course as a YouTube playlist as well (just without the course discussions, quizzes, exam, and certificate). Be sure to subscribe to support my channel and for easy access to future content.

Notes

You can schedule Microsoft Teams meetings from Outlook or Teams, but by scheduling through Teams your join information, chat, files, whiteboard, attendance, and more are all added to the event details after scheduling, enabling you to prepare dynamic and engaging meeting experiences in advance as well as follow-up with attendees and keep meeting assets organized.

Teams meetings ca be scheduled from the Calendar node, a channel, or a chat. 

  • If scheduled from Calendar or via chat, the invite is sent from your individual calendar and the meeting chat and recording (when applicable) will be in your Chat node – specifically, the thread with the attendee(s).
  • If scheduled from a channel, the invite is sent to the group/team and lives on the group calendar (but still individually invites members). Attendance, recordings, and meeting chat will all be found in the particular channel’s Posts feed as well as in the event details from Calendar.

Be sure to check out Microsoft’s Microsoft Teams Meetings Quick Start Guide for 32 pages of additional information, resources, one-pagers, etc. related to Microsoft Teams meetings.

Additional resources

How to use @ mentions and Activity in Microsoft Teams (Video)

Learn how to manage your activity and personal preferences in Microsoft Teams, as well as how the usage of @ mentions improves communication and attention. Did you know there are 4 different ways to @ mention others?

This video is part of my FREE 30+ lesson self-paced online training course called Collaboration in Microsoft 365 (OneDrive, SharePoint, and Teams). Enroll today at https://www.NateTheTrainer.com for the full learning experience including lesson discussions, quizzes, exams, and a completion certificate.

You can also watch the entire course as a YouTube playlist as well (just without the course discussions, quizzes, exam, and certificate). Be sure to subscribe to support my channel and for easy access to future content.

Notes

From the Activity node in Teams, you can see when you’ve been @mentioned, added to a team, when others react or reply to your messages in chats and channel conversations, and more. You may also see specific app activity, such as Insights letting you know it’s time to check-in.

You can adjust your own notifications per channel and chat, or universally using your Settings Notifications settings.

Additional resources